Internet of things, big data and smart farming are the future of agriculture

The world will need to produce 70% more food in 2050 than it did in 2006 in order to feed the growing population of the Earth, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

To meet this demand, farmers and agricultural companies are turning to the Internet of Things (IoT) for analytics and greater production capabilities.

BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, predicts that IoT device installations in the agriculture world will increase from 30 million in 2015 to 75 million in 2020, for a compound annual growth rate of 20%.

internet of things agriculture

OnFarm, which makes a connected farm IoT platform, expects the average farm to generate an average of 4.1 million data points per day in 2050, up from 190,000 in 2014.

farm-data

The future of farming is in collecting and analyzing big data in agriculture in order to maximize efficiency.

Source: http://uk.businessinsider.com/

Do you have an innovative project with a focus on technology transfer between Agri-Food and AeroSpace, Health, ICT sectors?

ACTTiVAte offers direct funding to innovative SME projects.

ACTTiVATes’ targeted SMEs are those being part of the supply chain of the Agri-food, AeroSpace, Health and ICT sectors, developing their activity from the first phase of the product life cycle and being able to develop new prototypes with technologies acquired from other sectors.

Besides, the aim is that SMEs are expected to generate new services and products with the acquired technology, fostering the creation and consolidation of emerging industries.

SMEs targeted are either well-established companies that want to enter new markets/value chains with cross-sector innovations and start-ups/spin-offs that will build up a business with a new technology.

Regarding the farming & food management chain, the most relevant technologies are:

Advanced sensing systems (soil, plant growth, diseases, etc.),supported by vision, radar, satellites and Unmanned Aerial Systems (drones), wireless sensor networks, robotics in primary production and in the food factory, 3D food printing, analytics/farming devices systems, farm management systems, farming instrumentation, advanced (including 3D) Geographic Information Systems (GIS) based on multi and hyper spectral images, big data applied to the farm and food management chain, APPs as farmers decision support system or technologies for greenhouses and closed systems, such as climate control, new covers to improve photosynthesis or light materials.

 

 

Digital Health

Digital Health can …

Digital health, which is the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to provide health services, can advance the goal of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare services worldwide.

The UN Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development launched a Working Group on Digital Health, chaired by the Novartis Foundation, in 2015. It aimed to explore what actions may be needed for digital health to be used to its full potential to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages, as well as foster Universal Health Coverage.

The Working Group on Digital Health will release a final report in early 2017. This will detail how strong government leadership and committed governance, and intra-governmental cooperation between ICT and Health can prevent duplication of efforts, harmonize digital technology standards and engage stakeholders.

Digital Health

 

Source: http://broadbandcommission.org/Documents/bbcominfographicFINAL.pdf

Do you have an innovative project with a focus on technology transfer between Health and AeroSpace, Agri-Food, ICT sectors?

ACTTiVAte offers direct funding to innovative SME projects.

ACTTiVAte will mainly focus on electrochemical sensing, microencapsulation, enzymatic based detection systems, electrochemical sensors, processes based on microorganisms, 3D bio-printing systems, big data network for anonymous health system records or nutritional software.

 

 

Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises in the ICT sector

First ‘Emerge’ Progress Report launched at Telecom World: ‘A review of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises in the ICT Sector 2016′ by ITU (International Telecommunication Union).

This report is the result of extensive months of engagement and discussion with a range of actors, including Ministries of ICT, Trade and Industry, national innovation agencies, large multinational companies, academic institutions, business and technology schools, incubators, accelerators, financiers, business mentors, industry associations and MSMEs themselves.

Key findings:
  • Information and Communications Technology (ICT) – including cloud computing and the rise of software-as-a-service – has reduced the cost of innovation and market access, allowing small tech businesses to compete with established industries.
  • Small tech businesses create new sources of employment.
  • Tech startup founders are predominantly university-educated, a factor that could alleviate high unemployment rates among those with a college degree in many developing nations. Traditional business models are failing to absorb this potential talent pool.
  • Rapidly rising mobile and Internet use over the last decade has created a tipping point for greater local access to content and services, and startups are stepping in to fill this void.
  • The startup revolution shifts the drivers of innovation from a focus on technology transfer, patents and trademarks to venture capital, co-working spaces, incubators and accelerators, and it pits an urban startup cafe culture at odds with government mega IT parks.

Read the full report here.

Do you have an innovative project with a focus on technology transfer between ICT and Health, AeroSpace, Agri-Food sectors?

  • ACTTiVAte offers direct funding to innovative SME projects.
  • It is expected to fund around 30 projects with up to 50.000€.

 

Big Data in Health

A Study on Big Data in Public Health, Telemedicine and Healthcare, financed by the Commission’s Health Programme, has been published last week.

In the context of this study, “big data in health” refers to large routinely or automatically collected datasets, which are electronically captured and stored. Using Big Data in health has many potential benefits. It may contribute to, for example, increasing the effectiveness and quality of treatments available for patients, widening possibilities for disease prevention by identifying risk factors at population, subpopulation, and individual levels, improving pharmacovigilance and patient safety, and reducing inefficiency and waste.

It identifies examples of the use of Big Data in Health, and puts forward recommendations covering 10 relevant fields: awareness raising, education and training, data sources, open data and data sharing, applications and purposes, data analysis, governance of data access and use, standards, funding and financial resources, and legal and privacy aspects.

Download the study here.

Do you have an innovative project with a focus on technology transfer between Health and AeroSpace, Agri-Food, ICT sectors?

ACTTiVAte offers direct funding to innovative SME projects.

ACTTiVAte will mainly focus on electrochemical sensing, microencapsulation, enzymatic based detection systems, electrochemical sensors, processes based on microorganisms, 3D bio-printing systems, big data network for anonymous health system records or nutritional software.

Source: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/health_food-safety/dyna/enews/enews.cfm?al_id=1746

 

Copernicus ‘Internationalisation of European Earth Observation companies Workshop’ Report, available now!

Last 22 november took place the Copernicus Internationalisation of European Earth Observation companies Workshop in Brussels. Final report and presentations are now available.

The European Commission (EC), which is responsible for the Copernicus programme, has initiated actions with the twofold objective of supporting Copernicus user uptake and gathering user requirements for the Next Generation of the Copernicus Space Component (CSC).

The objective of this specific workshop was to discuss opportunities, challenges and critical needs of European EO companies, in particular SMEs, to expand their business outside the EU, and to provide information on dedicated tools and initiatives available in support to internationalisation.

The workshop covered:

 Opportunities for internationalisation of EO companies linked to the Copernicus international strategy
 EU industry perspectives
 European support to SME internationalisation (with a special focus on support instruments)
 Other Pan-European initiatives
 SME expectations

103 people registered for the workshop and around 90 attended.

You can download the final report and the presentations here

 

Important benefits for Agriculture from the Copernicus Space EC Program

ACTTiVAte can support the use of satellite technology in agriculture with its SME financing program to be launched in April 2017.

The images and data from a constellation of satellites and in-situ components are used by a wide range of economic sectors with applications in precision farming, civil protection and insurance, oil & gas exploration, meteorology or urban monitoring, to name just a few.

Sales of data, value added services and applications related to Earth Observation, are undergoing a remarkable growth with an average annual rate of more than 13%.

The close link between satellite images and the wider geo-information products sector reinforces the strength of these downstream markets.

The increasingly central role of Big Data is leading to the downstream development of commercial activities.

Copernicus Market Report

The European Commission recently completed a large-scale study which examined the overall impact of the Copernicus programme on the European economy and its benefits for the space industry, the downstream sector and end-users. The results of this exercise are published today in the first Copernicus Market Report.

Building on the outcomes of previous studies and on interviews with more than 140 people representing institutional stakeholders as well as the private sector, from micro to large companies, the Market Report quantifies the benefits generated by Copernicus and shows that a Copernicus-enabled ecosystem is emerging.

Download the report here